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in dealing with the taliban. yet the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination, which has opened a power vacuum in the country. this is our report. >> ahmad wali karzai live behind layers of security. he had many enemies. today, his enemy was his end. assassins struck here at his home. a trusted assassin, a bodyguard. another bodyguard shot of a killer dead. it was too late, ahmad wali karzai died almost immediately and the news traveled fast. in kabul, president karzai announced his death. >> this morning, he said, my younger brother was murdered -- martyred in his house. this is the life of the afghan people. we have all suffered from the same pain. ahmad wali karzai was the most powerful player in kandahar. when we recently visited his compound, it was probably a day like today. he was the man to solve every problem. that created problems for him. >> this is for the big attacks, like suicide attacks. are two major suicide attacks on me -- on my office -- there were two major suicide attacks me -oe -- on my office. >> are they still happening? >> taliban pou >> he came u
was meeting tribal elders at his offices when the attack happened. the taliban has claimed responsibility. our correspondent, jonathan, has more for us from kabul. give us the reaction. this is another blow for the authorities. >> it is. this was a mayor who was trusted by president hamid karzai himself. he was trusted by the americans. also, this is another assassination of a high-profile figure. remember, two weeks ago, ahmad wali karzai, the president's half brother was killed. there does seem to be a pattern to these killings, targeting high-profile individuals oil to the government. >> this is the attempt, to assassinate high-profile government officials. this is the only strength they have so far, which will also be deterred by our security forces. we will try our best. in the last two years, it still continues. we will be looking after the insurgents. we strongly believe the only strength that they have now. >> do you mean the taliban? >> the insurgents, the taliban, and the terrorists. this country has given a lot of sacrifices. we will continue to try our best by education and trainin
. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there is a great air po
of the taliban coming back into the political system. ahmed rashid details the negotiatings that have been taking place between the united states and the taliban. for hours and hours the germans were intermediaries. nothing seems to have come of it. why is it proving so difficult to, in some way, bring the taliban into the tent? >> for a couple of things, i'd say about that, without commenting on the specifics of the piece in the "financial times" that you referenced. at the end of the day, this will have to be settled in a political settlement. i think that's clear. why is it hard? there's been a conflict there for a nufb years. the taliban is not an entity where it works at a specific address. you have to get these things to a point where you can have a set of reasonable conversations. what we've said, though, quite clearly and secretary of state said this in her speech earlier this year, the united states is prepared to work with the afghans, with the afghans in the lead to work towards a political settlement here and to bring the parties to the table without precondition. ultimately as the pr
in afghanistan. they also have the pakistani taliban attacking them. we're also the point of a new low in u.s.-pakistani relations. so the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable to me. >> what about indian intelligence-gathering and a security? there have been a number of threats, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authorities competence in this area? >> there will be questioned about another attack in mumbai. again, four attacks in the last 10 years. after 2008, there were major reviews within india about internal security, and in this case, there will be a very close examination of how quickly india responded. they have their national security guard deployed there. they have friends a unit on the scene. they need to hopefully -- they have forensic units on the scene. they need to hopefully see having that experience corrected in that beleaguered city. >> in other news, police and venezuela have regained control of a prison east of the capital after a standoff that lasted for 27 days. more than 800 inmates have not g
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
of afghanistan's leading clerics. the president's brother was assassinated at his home on tuesday. the taliban claimed responsibility for that killing. the commander of nato forces in afghanistan, and general david petraeus, has been holding security talks in pakistan as divisions deepen between washington and islamabad. the u.s. is holding hundreds of millions of dollars in security assistance. pakistan has called for an end to u.s. drone raids that have been taking an increasing civilian toll. >> u.s. drones' fly it around the clock in pakistan, targeting fighters in the mountainous region bordering afghanistan. civilians are often killed in the attacks. pakistan has condemned the ground strikes as a violation of its sovereignty, although some analysts believe they are carried out with the help of pakistan the -- pakistani intelligence. >> we are firmly against all terrorist groups. but we fight in partnership with other law-enforcement agencies. >> washington announced it was holding back a third of the military aid earmarked for pakistan, $100 million. airstrikes are putting more pressure
explosives and cargo planes bound for the united states. it was the taliban and pakistan s sent a man on a failed attempt to blow up an suv in times square. it is a al qaeda is in here adherents,individuals, sometimes with little or no physical contact to al qaeda had succumbed to its hateful ideology and have a engaged in or facilitated terrorist activities in the united states. these misguided individuals are spurred on by the likes of -- -- we have seen the tragic results of that military murder and the attack in fort hood did this is the first counterterrorism strategy that focuses on the ability of rocket and its networks to inspire people to attack us -- of al qaeda and its networks to inspire people to attack us from within. president obama have made it a priority to renew american leadership in the world, strengthening our alliances, deepening partnerships. al qaeda seeks to make america look like an enemy to the world's most and -- world's muslim. al qaeda 6 to bleed as financially by dryness into a long drawn-out wars that inflame -- seeks to lead us financially by driving u
a special personal interest in defeating the taliban. and afghanistan as a whole had seen how evil the taliban was. how much damage they could do to society as they burned paintings and books and films and totally suppressed freedom in afghanistan. they knew. these people were evil but they were afraid of them but with the united states weaponry, with our guidance and intelligence training these people defeated the taliban. what i was not aware of until we met with these folks and turns out i could have been aware, i just was not, but do you the research, you find out, the bush administration convinced the northern alliance, ok, now that you've whipped the taliban you need to totally disarm. because we're the united states and we're here and we'll make sure nothing happens to you again. well, the northern alliance messed up because they trusted us and they turned in their weapons, i asked one, you turned in all your weapons? well, apparently they have some small arms, but nothing that would allow them to take on the taliban again. naturally these people were concerned because they
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
two weeks. the taliban has claimed responsibility for all three attacks. >>> libyan rebels received a diplomatic boost today with recognition from great britain. the conflict there in libya has gone under the public's radar recently because of more pressing economic concerns here in washington. but national cute correspondent jennifer griffin tells us -- national security correspondent jennifer griffin tells the nato mission is still unaccomplished. >> this is a video broadcast on libya state television tuesday of the pan am lockerbie bomber rallying support for libyan leader muammar qaddafi in downtown tripoli. the lockerbie bomber was released on compassionate grounds by a scottish judge two years ago, because he was reportedly dying of cancer. but he's still standing, as is muammar qaddafi, five months after the start of an operation the white house said would be brief. >> i said at the outset, this was going to be a matter of days and not weeks. >> it's no longer costly american tomahawk missiles being used to protect the libyans from the dictator, but the cost for the mission c
. >> general, chuck hoss kinson from politico. you said before that with the problem of infiltration of taliban into afghan security forces, as the afghans take over more and more responsibility that there might be a need to accept a greater risk in terms of dealing with that problem. how would you assess the possibility of that risk going forward now and what steps would you be taking to mitigate it? >> the mitigation of that risk is being done by a combination of counterintelligence effort, by the coalition forces and most importantly the afghan national security forces are taking it head on. it's an issue of leadership and knowing your people and the afghan leadership and chain of command is taking that on and i believe we're moving in the right direction with that risk. >> i want to thing che -- change the subject real quick work the upcoming transition in the army, i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your interactions with general odeer noah and your thoughts on his leadership for the army going forward. >> i've had just one interact with general odierno at a utility confe
on with the taliban. do you feel the taliban should be part of afghanistan going forward? guest: the reconciliation is one of the major national programs our government already initiated. we have agreed with our international partners to have this reconciliation program. our president a couple of weeks back mentioned talks with different people going on through different channels. we have a high peace council the mainly responsible for the reconciliation. they have opened to the channel of communications. when you want to reconcile with people, you have to talk to them and open the channels for communication. there are different channels that want to reach out to opposition forces for the success of the reconciliation program. host: what about separating the taliban and al qaeda? guest: this is an afghan national program. is supported by the international community. our partners are saying it is an afghan-led reconciliation program. the afghans should be in the driving seat. we have three principles for that. the first one is to cut ties with al qaeda. the second one is to renounce violence. the th
, the taliban come back will there be a historical judgment that because of whatever reading of history he made that he will be considered the president that lost afgnistan? >> that's a really good question because the last chapter of the book, chapter 10, is called "good enough." and what they're hoping for is something they can term "good enough." that it will not be termed a loss. that it may not be a full-fledged victory. it m not be something that they can proclaim that everhing is wonrful in afghanistan w. but something they can say is good enough. they can get out at whatever point they do that, not having to say they lost. so that is definite play the people that talked to said that they'r hoping for and that's the last chapter of the book. >> rose: someone who had a personal experience with vietnam never wanted to put boots on the ground. >> never. he would do anything... he'd be a great hero bombing from 30,000 feet but don't put boots on the ground. that was his fundamental problem at that time. >> rose: well, and that's also the point of view of barack obama about libya, for exampl
democracy. with the american acquiescence and saudi financeing, the pakistani government created the taliban as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into
extraordinary. toppling the taliban. training afghan forces. putting al qaeda under unprecedented pressure, killing osama bin laden. our troops have battled a brutal insurgency, given the iraqi people an opportunity for a better future. it is in their hands. although it does not always make the headlines, every day our forces are serving with distinction in far-flung corners of the world, from western europe to east asia, faced with relentless adversaries. our troops have proven themselves, proven to be a generation of not only warriors but innovators, led by men like admiral mullen, who i have always respected. as i have worked with him every day, i have grown to respect him even more for what he has done. the master new languages, develop and employ advanced new technologies. they have taken on responsibilities once reserved for colonels and generals. the responsibility has extended beyond the battlefield. i was talking with my good buddy two days ago. it is astounding what you guys have trained these young men and women to do. they not only have to be warriors. they have to be politicia
operations in libya on other u.s. and nato military operations including operations against the taliban and al-qaeda in afghanistan. reporting on these issues is not provided for in the kerry-mccain resolution. given that the resolution would authorize military operations that could go on for as much as a year, and could expand in scope from current u.s. operations, i believe it's important that congress have the necessary tools to conduct oversight of these issues and to know their costs. i urge members to support the amendment. >> senator lugar, this is another excellent addition. i believe senator corker has the second degree, i think, originally senator lugar add 15-day reporting. i think the 60-day. and i think senator corker originally had 15 and i agreed to do 30 and i think that's reasonable for us to be able to have reasonable oversight. so senator corker do you want to propose your second degree and -- >> sure. i will acquiesce to our chairman and say 30-day reporting and i would like to change my amendment to a 30-day reporting and that's acceptable. >> any objection to modif
to bargain with the taliban over whether girls should be allowed to attend school." that's a pretty stark comparison, i admit, and i may not have gone that far, but frankly our republican brethren seem to hold to their ideology almost religiously. they see all things in black and white. they act as though they believe that those who disagree with that ideology are either unpatriotic or heretics and that the only truth is their truth. what they have forgotten is that negotiating with those with whom we disagree and reaching a compromise is what good governance is all about. the other falsehood here is spending is not a democratic value, as our friends on the other side would have us believe. it is a republican reality. it was the reckless spending of republicans combined with a reckless tax policy and an ideology that let wall street run wild, turning a free market into a free-for-all market that brought us to where we are today. let's remember it wasn't long ago that the budget was, in fact, balanced during another democratic administration, when we had budget surpluses as far as the eye
to the taliban we were going to withdraw. while they may not have watches, they do have calendars. [laughter] you drive them away if they know they only have to hideout for a certain time. i think of -- i think that was a mistake on his part. i think he should have made sure that the public elections were held in such a way that there was public confidence. i think there are lessons learned. one is, we have been there 10 years. id is time for the afghan people to be able to take responsibility -- it is time for the afghan people to take responsibility for there own safety that has been fought for so valiantly by our soldiers. we do want to see the afghans pick up the responsibility for the effort that goes for word. in the determination of when to pull our troops out should come as a result of the input of the people closest to the battlefield, the generals and the leaders on the ground. at the president should be listening more to them as david cameron in the u.k. did. >> i know you do not agree with the method we got into all there. now that we are there, do we need to stay in libya until colon
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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